DEA

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and state DEA oversee office-based buprenorphine treatment and have the right to inspect physicians' buprenorphine practices at any time. Audits are random and usually unscheduled; a minority of buprenorphine practices are visited by the DEA annually. Physicians who comply with federal recordkeeping and treatment guidelines have no need for concern.

Related Resources: 
Description: 
This log can be used to keep track of office inventories of buprenorphine medication.
Source: 
California Society of Addiction Medicine (CSAM)
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Commonly Used Forms: 
Physician stage in practice: 
Description: 
This is the full text of Title 21, Chapter 13 of the US Code, which deals with drug abuse prevention and control.
Source: 
Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)
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Physicians who are conducting office-based buprenorphine treatment should adhere to specific DEA medical recordkeeping requirements. Note that some of these requirements go beyond the standard Schedule III requirements.

Related Resources: 
Description: 
This is the full text of Title 21, Chapter 13 of the US Code, which deals with drug abuse prevention and control.
Source: 
Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)
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Description: 
Manual written by the DEA to assist physicians in understanding and complying with the Federal Controlled Substances Act. Topics covered include recordkeeping requirements, rules regarding prescription, and security requirements.
Source: 
US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)
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Description: 
This handout discusses how a prescribing physician may prepare for a visit from the DEA. Such visits are required by law for physicians prescribing buprenorphine, and involve things such as prescription and dispensing records, and adherence to prescribing limits on number of patients.
Source: 
PCSS
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Physician stage in practice: 
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Medical Recordkeeping

Description: 
A description of what should be included in a buprenorphine patient's medical record.

Many portions of the medical record contain general information that is not specific to patients with substance use disorders or opioid dependence. An example of this is the history portion of the record.

The following sections of the medical record should be noted for all substance use patients:

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Commonly Used Forms: 
Description: 
This is a list of each state's prescription monitoring program contact information.
Source: 
National Association of State Controlled Substances Authorities (NASCSA)
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Description: 
These FAQs address common questions regarding prescription drug monitoring programs.
Source: 
Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA)
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Description: 
This is the NASPER website which includes various information on the $60 million dollar 2005 grant to help states start or improve state-run prescription monitoring programs (PMPs).
Source: 
American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians
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Physician stage in practice: 
Description: 
This 2006 document explains the Drug Enforcement Agency's (DEA) role in regulation of controlled substances and the physician's legal responsibility to prescribe controlled substances for legitimate medical purposes.
Source: 
Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA)
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Description: 
This survey of 375 physicians found that confidence addressing drug problems was positively associated with having a buprenorphine waiver.
Source: 
Journal of General Internal Medicine, 2007
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Description: 
This is the full text of Title 21, Chapter 13 of the US Code, which deals with drug abuse prevention and control.
Source: 
Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)
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