Medical Comorbidities with Opioid Dependence

Medical complications can result from the opioid itself, as well as from the way it is administered. The main medical complications among the opioid-dependent population are related to injecting heroin.

You should routinely test these high-risk individuals for blood-borne and infectious diseases including the following:

  • HIV
  • Hepatitis B and C
  • Tuberculosis
  • Syphilis

You should also consider running these tests:

  • CBC to detect occult infection
  • Genital examination for chlamydia, gonococcal disease, and human papilloma virus
  • Skin examination for cellulitis (Kleber et al, 2006)
View ReferencesHide References
Kleber H, Weiss R, Anton R, et al. Practice guideline for the treatment of patients with substance use disorders, 3rd edition. American Psychiatric Association. 2010. Available at: http://www.guideline.gov/content.aspx?id=24158 Accessed on: 2015-06-30.
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